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Cultural Control


Cultural controls seek to control invasive species problems by establishing desired plant species. Cultural techniques manipulate the plant community through cultivating (cutting through and turning over the soil), re-seeding, fertilizing, and irrigating. Cultivation is not usually appropriate for natural areas because cultivation causes major disruption of established plant communities, and renders them susceptible to invasive species infestations. Therefore, cultural control methods may be most appropriate for fallow fields, agricultural land, or highly disturbed sites where a natural community is undesirable (e.g., military drop zones or landing strips).

Cultural controls are most useful for:

  • large restoration projects; and
  • re-establishing native plant communities on disturbed or depleted areas so desirable plants can prevent or reduce invasive species infestations.

In general, cultural control options for buffelgrass are limited to fallow fields, agricultural land, or highly disturbed sites where a natural community is undesirable.